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GratiotDriveInFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #15 on: May 4th, 2007, 12:23am »

Here's a link to copyright law concerning theatrical performances.

www.unc.edu/%7Eunclng/public-d.htm

Even the "rot gut" stuff is probably protected for years to come and would prevent someone from profitting by showing them for public consumption without paying the piper

Here's a couple more related links.

www.utsystem.edu/OGC/INTELLECTUALPROPERTY/mono3.htm

http://lecatr.people.wm.edu/copy.htm#How%20long%20does%20a%20copyright
« Last Edit: May 4th, 2007, 12:33am by GratiotDriveInFan » Logged

CanuckDrive-InFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #16 on: May 5th, 2007, 2:48pm »

Here are two YouTube videos that have info and specs of the Christie digital projectors ... would love to hear people's opinions and feedback!!

Video #1 --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gcGpQdFgoc

Video #2 --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOa8Nuid6gY

Cheers.
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If you had a car and a girl said yes she'd go with you to a drive-in movie you knew she was expecting more than popcorn and the doings up there on the screen. There was no sense in just going for a kiss. You could get that in a regular movie house. --- an excerpt from the book 'Tis by Frank McCourt
elsrbagokrapp
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #17 on: May 5th, 2007, 5:04pm »

on May 4th, 2007, 12:23am, GratiotDriveInFan wrote:
Here's a link to copyright law concerning theatrical performances.

www.unc.edu/%7Eunclng/public-d.htm

Even the "rot gut" stuff is probably protected for years to come and would prevent someone from profitting by showing them for public consumption without paying the piper

Here's a couple more related links.

www.utsystem.edu/OGC/INTELLECTUALPROPERTY/mono3.htm

http://lecatr.people.wm.edu/copy.htm#How%20long%20does%20a%20copyright


Looks like the copyright laws changed from what I remembered a few years back. The 1978 date is the same but now they have automatic extension which wasn't the case in the past. Previously, a movie made in 1970 would be in the public domain unless renewed and many of them never were. That's why you see "It's a Wonderful Life" each year around Christmastime. It's free to the TV broadcasters because the makers didn't renew their copyright!
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michdi
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #18 on: Dec 20th, 2007, 12:06pm »

The scuttlebutt I have heard on this is that the digital projection changeover has stalled somewhat. Apparently there is some resistance from some exhibitors and the cost savings that were predicted are not materializing just yet.
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thebarnman
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #19 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:01am »

on Feb 28th, 2006, 10:22am, GratiotDriveInFan wrote:
I Googled "Technalight" and found this description: Technalight is a combination of specially engineered lamps and reflectors designed to restore brilliance, resolution and clarity to the projected image and any lamphouse can be retro-fitted with the system without changing the projector's existing main head.

Technalight is available from Robert Film Service and I think they're out of Canada. Several drive-ins in California have Technalight and they're getting rave reviews for it. I don't know if Technalight can be incorporated with digital projection but it's obviously enhancing film systems now.

Fortunately, my local drive-in, the Scottsdale Six has Technalight on all of it's screens. It's not cheap. They started using it on screen one, then the next year they put it on the rest of the screens. I don't see why it could not be used for digital projection. Digital projection in itself is brighter (even without Technalight) because there is not a shutter breaking up the light like there is while using a film projector.

on Feb 28th, 2006, 10:22am, GratiotDriveInFan wrote:
Daylight savings time is the biggest reason movies have to start later. Screen position offers marginal advantage as far as sunlight is concerned and could be a big disadvantage in lot utilization. First, you have to be located on the correct side of a north-south street for esthetic appearance and for the screen tower to face west so the screen is on the east side. Sometimes a forest-like tree line helps darken a drive-in lot. Second, since competetive economic survival dictates a multiscreen operation, you couldn't use a central projection booth/snack bar arrangement if you had to position all screens in the same direction. An alternative would be that digital projection would not require the hands on labor of a film system and you could probably put them on automatic and each could have their own mini projection booth location. I don't have independant recollection of the Gratiot Drive-In projection arrangement, but Ron's early aerial photos seem to show a projection booth separate from the concession building.
Joe

The latest we get dark here in AZ is about 8pm. It was one of the weirdest things I had to get used to when I moved from MI. Another thing that's different, AZ does not do Daylight savings time. We are known as the "Valley Of The Sun". We have so much sun, we don't want anymore! The number of sunny days is about equal to cloudy days in MI. That part was easy to get used to!


on Feb 28th, 2006, 10:22am, GratiotDriveInFan wrote:
One drawback would be if the screens were all lined up in a single row in the same direction, like parallel parking, it would look like a bank of TVs.

You mean like how it was set up at the Pontiac Silver Dome?!!
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michigandriveins
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #20 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 03:42am »

on Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:01am, thebarnman wrote:
Fortunately, my local drive-in, the Scottsdale Six has Technalight on all of it's screens. It's not cheap. They started using it on screen one, then the next year they put it on the rest of the screens. I don't see why it could not be used for digital projection. Digital projection in itself is brighter (even without Technalight) because there is not a shutter breaking up the light like there is while using a film projector.


Can you explain how Technalight works?




on Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:01am, thebarnman wrote:
You mean like how it was set up at the Pontiac Silver Dome?!!


Or an Autoscope Drive-In!

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thebarnman
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #21 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 2:52pm »

on Mar 22nd, 2009, 03:42am, michigandriveins wrote:
Can you explain how Technalight works?

In one of GratiotDriveInFan posts, he describing it pretty much verbatim from the people who offer the Technalight upgrade.


on Feb 28th, 2006, 10:22am, GratiotDriveInFan wrote:
Technalight is a combination of specially engineered lamps and reflectors designed to restore brilliance, resolution and clarity to the projected image and any lamphouse can be retro-fitted with the system without changing the projector's existing main head.


In my own words, Technalight is simply a combination of engineered bulbs and reflectors specifically designed to eliminate waisted light to help increase brightness. The same lamphouse can be used, however the bulb is different and so is the mirror. As far as the bulb, I don't know if it operates cooler with the same light output, or more light output that maintains the same temperature. However I do know that the mirror is radically shaped differently. It's designed to be very, very efficient...another words, almost all if not all of the light energy is being reflected to help increase image brightness. With standard lamp houses, there is much waisted light and therefore, the screen brightness suffers.

Standard lamp and mirror technology is normally not a problem for indoor theaters. Indoor theater's projection to screen distances are not anywhere the distances like what we experience at many drive-ins. This does not mean that indoor theaters would not benefit using Technalight, some indoor theaters do in fact currently use Technalight. And the drive-in's I've seen that use Technalight, I've seen images just about as bright as what were're accustomed to at a regular movie house.

Even with the use of Technalight, some screen distances are so far, that overall brightness still lags behind projected images at a indoor theater. However, it ends up being much better than what it used to look like! For example, during a dark movie where before I could not even see a face, a face can now easily be seen.


Not to be picking on the Capri, however I've read where their screen brightness could use a little help. "Recent installations of the TECHNALIGHT system in the U.S. and Canada have increased the light output on screen by as much as 500%." Except for what ever the cost, Technalight would be a perfect solution for the Capri!

Here's their website...


http://www.robertfilm.com/english.html

OR...both are a link to the same site...

http://www.technalight.com/english.html
« Last Edit: Mar 22nd, 2009, 3:04pm by thebarnman » Logged

michigandriveins
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #22 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 5:56pm »

on Mar 22nd, 2009, 2:52pm, thebarnman wrote:
In one of GratiotDriveInFan posts, he describing it pretty much verbatim from the people who offer the Technalight upgrade.




In my own words, Technalight is simply a combination of engineered bulbs and reflectors specifically designed to eliminate waisted light to help increase brightness. The same lamphouse can be used, however the bulb is different and so is the mirror. As far as the bulb, I don't know if it operates cooler with the same light output, or more light output that maintains the same temperature. However I do know that the mirror is radically shaped differently. It's designed to be very, very efficient...another words, almost all if not all of the light energy is being reflected to help increase image brightness. With standard lamp houses, there is much waisted light and therefore, the screen brightness suffers.

Standard lamp and mirror technology is normally not a problem for indoor theaters. Indoor theater's projection to screen distances are not anywhere the distances like what we experience at many drive-ins. This does not mean that indoor theaters would not benefit using Technalight, some indoor theaters do in fact currently use Technalight. And the drive-in's I've seen that use Technalight, I've seen images just about as bright as what were're accustomed to at a regular movie house.

Even with the use of Technalight, some screen distances are so far, that overall brightness still lags behind projected images at a indoor theater. However, it ends up being much better than what it used to look like! For example, during a dark movie where before I could not even see a face, a face can now easily be seen.


Not to be picking on the Capri, however I've read where their screen brightness could use a little help. "Recent installations of the TECHNALIGHT system in the U.S. and Canada have increased the light output on screen by as much as 500%." Except for what ever the cost, Technalight would be a perfect solution for the Capri!

Here's their website...


http://www.robertfilm.com/english.html

OR...both are a link to the same site...

http://www.technalight.com/english.html




Do you know how much the installation typically costs?
I found a list of their installations, don't see any drive-ins on there. I wonder how many drive-ins have it now?
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CanuckDrive-InFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #23 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 8:59pm »

I do not know how much installation is, but I know for a fact that the Premier Operating drive-in theatres here in Ontario use the Robert Film lamphouse installation.

The picture quality is night and day better. Darker films look better (always a drive-in problem) and the Pixar films are vibrant and bright outdoors.
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If you had a car and a girl said yes she'd go with you to a drive-in movie you knew she was expecting more than popcorn and the doings up there on the screen. There was no sense in just going for a kiss. You could get that in a regular movie house. --- an excerpt from the book 'Tis by Frank McCourt
CanuckDrive-InFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #24 on: Mar 22nd, 2009, 9:04pm »

on Mar 22nd, 2009, 03:42am, michigandriveins wrote:
Can you explain how Technalight works?






Or an Autoscope Drive-In!



Do you have a better larger picture of that Autoscope Drive-In?
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If you had a car and a girl said yes she'd go with you to a drive-in movie you knew she was expecting more than popcorn and the doings up there on the screen. There was no sense in just going for a kiss. You could get that in a regular movie house. --- an excerpt from the book 'Tis by Frank McCourt
thebarnman
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #25 on: Mar 23rd, 2009, 12:43am »

on Mar 22nd, 2009, 5:56pm, michigandriveins wrote:
Do you know how much the installation typically costs?

I wish I did. And at the same time, I know we would all love to know! You know how funny some companies are if you really have no business asking. But that won't stop me from trying. I'm sure it's not a simple answer. Another words, they probably need some info before giving a final figure, such as type of equipment the theater currently is using, how long is the distance from projector to screen, what kind of lens they are using (another words, how fast is the lens) and probably a few other variables. Then they probably have varying price ranges depending on what the desired luminance level is to be achieved with the equipment the theatre currently uses VS the theatre's spending budget.

And of course, this is all speculation on my part, but hey, it does sound reasonable right??!!! I know a couple people I can ask without contacting Robert Film Service just to maybe get an idea. I'll see what I can find out in the next few days.


on Mar 22nd, 2009, 5:56pm, michigandriveins wrote:
I found a list of their installations, don't see any drive-ins on there. I wonder how many drive-ins have it now?

Here is a link to a few drive-ins I know that have it. At the same time, I know the list you pointed out is outdated. It's pretty much what I remember seeing about a couple years ago.

I do have an interesting story. I remember seeing Technalight at the Mission Tiki drive-in and being impressed. After that experience, I was hoping that one day my local drive-in would also add Technalight. In a suggestion letter I wrote to the Scottsdale Six's main office in CA, Technalight was one of my suggestions. After about a few months or so after sending my letter, I had heard rumor that the top people from Syufy took a trip to another CA drive-in to see a demo of what Technalight could do. I heard they were really impressed. And that Technalight was going to be added to at least one of the screens at the Scottsdale Six. Some months later, Technalight was added to screen number one. About a year later, Technalight was added to the rest of the screens at the Scottsdale Six. I understand (but I'm not sure) that Technalight was added to all their drive-ins, but I don't know at what capacity.

I can tell you on their promotional material, they advertise "NEW TECHNALIGHT FOR A BRIGHTER CRISPER PRESENTATION".* *Except Sacramento

So there you go, all I know about Technalight!!!

Oh wait, there's more!!!

I found this cool post on the internet about Technalight....

Screen is over 120 feet wide! Scope picture taken with cheap camera with no flash from about 250 feet back. Looks bright thanks to Robert Film service!
taken 7-10-04



Of course images can be manipulated to just about make it look how you want, however from what I can see from this image, it's about the same of the best example I've seen in real life!
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GratiotDriveInFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #26 on: Mar 23rd, 2009, 10:30am »

Judging from the text of their website, it doesn't sound like Technalight was made for Digital Projection. They talk about film emulsion degradation. But then again, they also mention bulbs and reflectors and I assume that digital projection employs bulbs lenses and possibly reflectors too. We should get some information direct from Robert Film Services.

http://www.drive-ins.com/gallery/mitgrat
« Last Edit: Mar 23rd, 2009, 10:36am by GratiotDriveInFan » Logged

thebarnman
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #27 on: Mar 23rd, 2009, 12:08pm »

Against my better judgement, I went ahead and sent Robert Film Services an email to ask two questions.

1. Average cost for installing Technalight on two screens.
2. If Technalight could benefit digital projection.

I say against my better judgement because some years ago, while working for a big chain grocery store as a photo guy at a one hour photo place, I called and left a message with a question with a company that makes a certain product that the grocery store had just bought and had installed. It was the company that makes those self service check out lines.

Anyway, I was simply curious about one aspect of their equipment. Well, the next time I went to work, I was approached by the store manager who looked like I did something horribly wrong. I was told point blank if I ever wanted to change anything about the company to take it to management first.

Wow, talk about a huge misunderstanding! It was then that I learned some companies simply won't tolerate anyone with a question (no matter how general) unless you have a business relation with them.

So (IMHO) asking Robert Film Services about the cost of one of their products is a huge no no! Even if it was not a big deal, I'm sure they won't want us talking about the price of their equipment. Probably for competition purposes. And I'm sure the cost varies from place to place based on a lot of different aspects of each operation. So answering a general question like that is probably not in their best interest.

On the other hand, if Technalight can benefit digital projection, I would think they would be enthusiastic on telling us so. If so, it's something they would definitely want to state on their website!
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thebarnman
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #28 on: Mar 23rd, 2009, 12:35pm »

On a related note, The Field of Dreams Drive-in claims to have the brightest picture of any drive-in in the USA!

I wonder if they have Technalight. Or maybe their projector is close to the screen and the screen is not all that big. There's a lot of factors going on here. They may also be using a really fast lens. Meaning more light getting to the screen and focus has to be really critical!


They state...
"The “foot-lambert” is used in the motion picture industry to measure the luminance of images on a projection screen. The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) recommends a light output of 16 foot-lamberts for commercial movie theaters with no film in the projector."

They claim to have a 18FL.

Typical drive-in theaters have 7-12FL

And Typical Indoor theaters have 16FL (probably because it's standard).

http://www.fieldofdreamsdrivein.com/index-2.html
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GratiotDriveInFan
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Re: Digital Projection
« Reply #29 on: Mar 23rd, 2009, 1:16pm »

The best way to NOT sell something is to keep it a secret. What good would it do to deny access to information to people who are interested in promoting a product specifically made for a business that is limited, and, in opinion of some, a dying industry?
One would think that enthusiastic people who have a vested interest in keeping that industry alive would be the biggest promoters of such a product!
In the case of the self scanning machines, perhaps you should have kept your identity a secret when you contacted the company. Anonymity would have saved you a trip to the wood shed! LOL Incognito.......
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